Dr. Ind. Chris Szwejk

rzecznik@sggw.edu.pl

SGGW Spokesperson

mobile :+48 604 534 879
tel.: +48 22 593 19 98

Anna Kiryyov

anna_kiryjow@sggw.edu.pl




tel.: + 48 22 593 19 97

Press briefcase

  • Facts and figures

    Detailed statistical and financial data on the activities of the Warsaw University of Life Sciences are available on the website of the SGGW Public Information Bulletin.

    SGGW is a modern university of natural sciences, ranks first in the rankings of agricultural universities, and is at the forefront of Polish universities.

    16,000 students

    1,300 lecturers

    38 fields of study

    doctoral school

    16 scientific institutes

    13 faculties

    Joint research and teaching
    with more than 275 international universities from 50 countries around the world

    Modern
    Campus
    (more than 70 hectares of land)

    Excellent teaching
    conditions
    (possibility of simultaneously studying at other agricultural universities – MOSTAR programme,
    1 500 teaching rooms, 60 computer labs,
    300 lecture and exercise rooms, 24 halls, modern library,
    Small Animal Clinic, Horse Clinic, Animal, Research Centres,
    several experimental plants and farms across the country)

    4,000 seats in 14 well-equipped student homes
    (Internet in each room, a dozen student dining halls)

    Modern sports
    facilities
    (indoor swimming pool, sports halls, indoor tennis courts, gym, sports fields, hippotherapy centre)

  • Briefly about the university

    The Warsaw University of Life Sciences is one of the largest and most prestigious universities in the country. It conducts research and didactic activities, as well as work implementing research into the economy. Since SGGW is a university of life sciences, it is the natural sciences that are dominating here, supported by technical, & economic science, as well as humanities.

    SGGW was founded by  Stanisław Staszic and Stanisław Potockidate in 1816.
    The beginnings of SGGW are connected with the establishment of the Agronomic Institute in Marymont, the first agricultural university in Poland and the fourth one in Europe (Hungary – 1797, Switzerland – 1804, Germany – 1806). In 1918, the Agronomic Institute finally took the name of the Royal-Polish School of the Warsaw University of Life Sciences, and in 1919 the University was nationalized and called the Warsaw University of Life Sciences.

    One of the university’s key advantages is its highly developed infrastructure. The SGGW campus is one of the best planned and equipped education and research teams in the country. In addition to this, it also boasts some of the most developed social facilities: student houses, food halls, swimming pool, tennis courts, and other sports facilities. All teaching, research, and social facilities are located in an area of 70 hectares. There is also no shortage of outdoor rest areas. A large part of the university’s grounds is a beautiful park.

    The Warsaw University of Life Sciences is one of the largest teaching centres in Poland. First-degree, undergraduate, or engineering study programmes last from 3 to 4 years, depending on the field of study, and second-degree studies – master’s degrees – last 1.5-2 years. After the first degree, the student has the opportunity to continue his/her master’s degree in the current or another field of study. This gives them the opportunity to change their education profile after the first degree and get two diplomas in different fields of study. The university operates an ECTS scoring system that allows students to exchange between universities at home and abroad. SGGW conducts several dozen postgraduate courses and has a Doctoral School.

    The modernly managed Main Library of Władysław Grabski, using innovative technological solutions, offers access to the latest Polish and English-speaking scientific publications and valuable fiction. Thanks to cooperation with many online databases, students have free access to textbooks. Using its resources is improved by devices that enable automated return and rental of books, several thousand of which are in so-called free access. Library resources are close to half a million items.

    SGGW student dormitories have a level of comfort to match their Western counterparts. 4000 students live in 1, 2 and 3-bed rooms with bathroom and kitchen. Each student dorm has a broadband internet connection. Student droms are also equipped with modern laundromats, bicycle storage rooms, and sports exercise rooms. There are also student clubs and canteens on campus offering a wide range of tasty dishes. All this makes the SGGW campus one of the most comfortable science and housing teams in the country.

    SGGW works with about 275 foreign partners on all continents. This allows employees and students to travel to partner universities for internships or studies. The number of foreign students coming to study offered by SGGW is also steadily increasing. In addition to academic trips, students have the opportunity to travel to the UK, Switzerland, Norway, the Netherlands, and the United States, and many other countries as part of foreign internships.

    At the University there are numerous scientific associations, student organizations and other associations (i.a. Student Government, Academic Choir, Promni Folk Artistic Ensemble, Representative Orchestra), student clubs and various types of discussion clubs.

    For years, the University has been the foremost in the rankings of higher education institutions at home and abroad, and in the opinion of students it has gained the name “Student Friendly University” and “The most innovative and creative university in Poland”.

  • Recruitment

    In the 2020/2021 academic year , the Warsaw University of Life Sciences offered 38 interesting fields of study to future students. A total of 5,285 places were prepared for all courses of First, Second Degree and Master’s degree studies.

    The most popular programmes for the 2020/2021 academic year were:

    • Finance and accounting – 6.6 people per spot
    • Computer science – 5.6 people per spot
    • Nutrition studies – 5.5 people per spot
    • Veterinary medicine – 5.5 people per spot
    • Management – 5.0 people per spot
    • Logistics – 5.0 people per spot
    • Economics – 4.1 people per spot
    • Biotechnology – 4.0 people per spot
    • Tourism and recreation – 3.9 people per spot

    The most popular programmes for the 2019/2020 academic year were:

    • Finance and accounting – 7.8 people per spot
    • Computer science – 5.3 people per spot
    • Logistics – 5.3 people per spot
    • Tourism and recreation – 5.1 people per spot
    • Management – 4.9 people per spot
    • Nutrition  studies- 4.8 people per spot
    • Economy – 4.4 people per spot
    • Veterinary medicine – 4.3 people per spot
    • Biotechnology – 4.0 people per spot

    The most popular programmes for the 2018/2019 academic year were:

    • Finance and accounting – 9.5 people per spot
    • Nutrition studies – 7.1 people per spot
    • Logistics – 6.9 people per spot
    • Tourism and recreation – 6.9 people per spot
    • Veterinary medicine – 6.2 per seat
    • Computer Science – 6.2 people per spot
    • Biotechnology – 5.3 people per spot

    The most popular programmes for the 2017/2018 academic year were:

    • Finance and accounting – 8.6 people per spot
    • Tourism and recreation – 8.2 people per spot
    • Nutritionist – 7.8 people per spot
    • Logistics – 7.3 people per spot
    • Computer science – 6.7 people per spot
    • Veterinary medicine – 6.5 people per spot
    • Management – 5.0 people per spot
    • Biotechnology – 4.8 people per spot
    • Economics – 4.6 people per spot

    The most popular programmes for the 2016/2017 academic year were:

    • Nutrition studies- 10.2 people per spot
    • Finance and Accounting – 9.4 people per spot
    • Logistics – 7.0 people per spot
    • Veterinary medicine – 6.6 people per spot
    • Computer science – 5.3 people per spot
    • Construction – 5.0 people per spot
    • Management – 5.0 people per spot

    The most popular programmes for the 2015/2016 academic year were:

    • Nutrition studies – 10.2 people per spot
    • Finance and Accounting – 9.9 people per spot
    • Veterinary medicine- 6.8 people per spot
    • Logistics – 6.2 people per spot
    • Economics – 5.9 people per spot
    • Biotechnology – 5.0 people per spot
    • Computer science – 4.7 people per spot
    • Management – 4.1 people per spot
    • Renewable Energy Technologies – 4.1 people per spot

    The most popular programmes for the 2014/2015 academic year were:

    • Finance and Accounting – 10.1 people per spot
    • Nutrition studies – 9.0 people per spot
    • Logistics – 6.9 people per spot
    • Economics – 5.9people per spot
    • Spatial Economy – 5.6 people per spot
    • Biotechnology – 5.4 people per spot
    • Renewable Energy Technologies – 4.2 people per spot
    • Computer Science – 4.0 people per spot

    The most popular programmes for the 2013/2014 academic year were:

    • Finance and accounting – 10 people per spot
    • Nutrition studies – 7.7 people per spot
    • Biotechnology – 7.1 people per spot
    • Logistics – 6.9 people per spot
    • Veterinary medicine – 6.7 people per spot
    • Spatial management – 6.5 people per spot
    • Renewable energy technology – 5.3 people per spot
    • Economics – 5.1people per spot
    • Construction – 4.5 people per spot
    • Computer science – 4.4 people per spot

    The average for all programmes was 3.3 people per spot

    The most popular programmes for the 2012/2013 academic year were:

    • Finance and accounting – 9.9 per seat,
    • Veterinary medicine (master’s degree) – 9.0 per seat,
    • Nutritionist – 8.5 people/place,
    • Spatial management – 8.4 per seat,
    • Biotechnology – 7.9 per seat,
    • Logistics – 6.7 per seat.

    The average for all directions was 4.4 per seat.

    The most popular programmes for the 2011/2012 academic year were:

    • Finance and accounting – 11.0 per seat,
    • Spatial management – 10.1 per seat,
    • Nutritionist – 9.7 people/place,
    • Veterinary medicine– 9,4 per seat,
    • Biotechnology – 8.6 per seat,

    The average for all directions was 5.0 per seat.

    The most popular programmes for the 2010/2011 academic year were:

    • Spatial management – 15.4 people per spot
    • Nutrition science – 10.4 people per spot
    • Veterinary medicine – 9,8 people per spot
    • Finance and accounting – 9.6 people per spot
    • Biotechnology – 8.7 people per spot

    The average for all programmes was 6.0 people per spot

    Number of undergraduate graduates:

    • 2012: 902 full-time graduates and 603 part-time graduates. A total of 1505 graduates.
    • 2011: 836 full-time graduates and 663 part-time graduates. A total of 1499 graduates.
    • 837 full-time graduates and 753 part-time graduates. A total of 1590 graduates.

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